What makes a person good at marketing?

While specific skill requirements may vary from job to job, the characteristics needed to succeed in marketing are consistent across the professional spectrum. Good marketers are first-class communicators, good team players, and qualified project managers, with excellent analytical and creative skills.

What makes a person good at marketing?

While specific skill requirements may vary from job to job, the characteristics needed to succeed in marketing are consistent across the professional spectrum. Good marketers are first-class communicators, good team players, and qualified project managers, with excellent analytical and creative skills. Marketing has always benefited from creatives who use their gifts to create campaigns and slogans that make people laugh, cry, think and, most importantly, buy. Just as a composer is able to construct words with which the audience can identify, a successful marketing manager will be able to access a segment of society and not only identify with the culture, but also influence it.

While many of the tasks a marketing manager will perform involve working with others, they must be able to work creatively with other members of a team and make the most of creativity while working together. As important as qualities such as people's creativity and skills are to the marketing manager, at the end of the day, everything revolves around business. The client must be sold in the advertising agency itself at the beginning of a project and then must buy the idea presented by the marketing organization. The real test, of course, is when the finished campaign is released to the public and sales are recorded.

But how do you measure motivation? How can you tell if the candidate you're interviewing has one? Measuring a candidate's communication skills is something that occurs naturally throughout the hiring process, from the evaluation of their cover letter (is it direct and direct or long and incoherent? Do you persuasively explain why they are the best candidates for the position? Do you like them a little more after reading it?) to the interview (How do they respond when you ask them a challenging question? Do they use a lot of “um” and “uh “or do they speak with confidence?) and hopefully the activity of the situation (I like to present a fictitious situation to them and ask them to inform me, as a customer, of the company's marketing performance). With every marketer I hire, I look for leadership skills and potential. This may seem strange, because not all marketing candidates are being hired for a position that involves leading others. I think it's just “leadership”.

Have they played a leadership role in the school or in a club to which they belong? What are your interests outside of work and how do you balance them with your career? What is it that they are passionate about and how are they working to improve it? A candidate with strong leadership skills will naturally be a better and more effective marketer, and if they are ever interested in moving to a leadership role, they will have greater potential for promotion. Over the years, there has to be one trait that all high-performing marketers have: they are committed to being lifelong learners. One of the questions I like to ask marketing manager candidates is “What is your favorite marketing book or blog? Permanent students can respond immediately with a list of authors they follow and books they have enjoyed reading, along with the reasons why. These are the candidates you want to hire.

When a problem occurs, you can't just use a set of default rules to solve it. Instead, you need to apply critical thinking skills. Strong critical thinking skills are very important in marketing, precisely because our own innate prejudices as human beings are the things that can prevent us from being effective marketers. How can a candidate's critical thinking skills be measured? When I hire salespeople, I look for people who take the initiative.

I want someone who solves problems and doesn't wait for someone to give them a solution, someone who can assess a situation and take action. One way to evaluate the initiative is to ask potential marketing candidates about an idea or concept they have introduced or defended in a previous job. Can you cite an example of an occasion when you have spoken and shared a new idea? Did they take action and implement? Candidates with initiative tend to think like owners rather than employees, making them more likely to contribute to the company's long-term growth. This goes without saying in a career known for communication, yet many marketers still lack solid communication skills.

This not only refers to verbal communication, but it also means exceptional writing skills. Writing is more important than you think: it's essential to creating succinct and effective ads, campaigns, email copy, and more. If you're into marketing but don't think communication is your strong suit, make an effort to read extensively and practice your writing skills whenever possible. Contests that require a response of 25 words or less are a great way to practice conveying your message in a short, sharp, and witty way.

Learn more about the online MBA No. 1 from Australia. The digital marketing industry is always growing and evolving. Marketers never know what new platform or trend they'll find next week.

Innovation is the key in all walks of life, but in the corporate world and the marketing world, new and improved business solutions drive the business and the person must be an innovator to attract, retain and grow customers. Want to continue learning new marketing strategies Know your customers and markets. The following are some skills needed for marketing executive and marketing personality traits. If you follow the social channels or blogs of these marketing leaders, you'll quickly notice that, while they share many qualities, these influencers have very different personalities and, as a result, each has unique communities and followers.

As seen above, there are many traits that a person needs to have to be a successful marketing executive. A marketing person who aspires to be victorious must be able to understand, formulate and execute business plans with precision. If a person doesn't love your organization, your brand, you can't effectively market and promote your brand. Whether you work in a team or department, or you're the only marketing person in your organization, a marketer needs to know how to work in a team.

A successful marketing person must be able to build relationships, as they are the most important aspect in the corporate world. People expect the successful marketing manager to be well presented and have a direct personality. A person with good networks and contacts gets the best deal, and this is even more true in the case of marketing. You probably think that ambition, creativity, or collaboration are obvious personality traits you need to succeed in marketing.

Everyone has their own personality, but a marketer must strive to be attractive and innovative. A person with experience in a variety of roles such as sales, operations, and finance will be more successful in overall marketing compared to those with exclusive marketing experience. . .